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School Days for Ruby

Book Swamp -

Our Australian Girl - School Days for Ruby
Author: Penny Mathews

School Days for Ruby is about Ruby Quinlan and what life was like for her in 1931. She lived in England with her mother and her aunt's family. She had a nasty best friend and since these new kids in school moved in, the trouble had just begun. She faces being best friends with
kids whose dad was in jail and starts getting bullied by the school. Thankfully for her school teacher as a strict man he believes he can help her and the newies. At last she finds out that her own dad is in jail as well. I feel so sorry for Ruby and the book is sooo sad!!!
Type of story: History
How good was it? Fantastic

Sithmi
Cranbourne Library Adventures' Club
Age: 10

'Written by Women' Top 20

Reading Rewards - reviews -

Back in May 2014, the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction U.K. launched the #ThisBook campaign to find out which books, written by women, have had the biggest impact on readers.

Following the launch, the judges took to Twitter to ask the general public to share their submission and thousands used the #ThisBook hashtag to take part and nominate the book that changed their life.  

Harper Lee’s timeless classic To Kill a Mockingbird took the top spot as the most influential book written by a woman, with Margaret Atwood’s dystopian fiction, The Handmaid’s Tale, and Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, taking second and third place respectively.  



Interestingly, nearly half of the top 20 were published before 1960, including Lousa May Alcott’s Little Women (8th) and Middlemarch (15th) by George Eliot. 

To view the top 20 list, click here
Deb.
PS - More than a little surprised at what came in 4th spot!

The Universe versus Alex Woods

Reading Rewards - reviews -

The Universe Versus Alex Woods by Gavin Extence

From the cover: A tale of an unexpected friendship, an unlikely hero and an improbable journey, Alex's story treads the fine line between light and dark, laughter and tears. And it might just strike you as one of the funniest, most heartbreaking novels you've ever read. 

Alex Woods knows that he hasn't had the most conventional start in life. He knows that growing up with a clairvoyant single mother won't endear him to the local bullies. He also knows that even the most improbable events can happen - he's got the scars to prove it. What he doesn't know yet is that when he meets ill-tempered, reclusive widower Mr Peterson, he'll make an unlikely friend. Someone who tells him that you only get one shot at life. That you have to make the best possible choices. So when, aged seventeen, Alex is stopped at Dover customs with 113 grams of marijuana, an urn full of ashes on the passenger seat, and an entire nation in uproar, he's fairly sure he's done the right thing ...

The universe versus Alex Woods is a wacky novel with far-fetched events, interesting scientific facts and an exploration of big issues such as euthanasia and one's right to be in control of their own destiny. 

I really liked Alex. He is an odd teenager who ends up with epilepsy after being hit on the head by a meteorite. He has time out from school and doesn’t relate well with his peers so he builds a support network of adult friends. His friendship with Mr Peterson is really strong and shapes Alex’s journey, including a daring road trip across Europe, to keep his long-held promise. 

The Universe Versus Alex Woods isn’t a page turner but has plenty to keep the reader interested. The novel has some dark themes but plenty of light moments too – especially when the meteorite tears a hole in the bathroom ceiling. 
Sandra E

Views of Pakenham from the Cardinia Shires Offices in 1983

Links to our Past - history -

The Shire of Pakenham Municipal Offices and Council Chambers, in Henty Way, were officially opened  by the Governor of Victoria, Sir Brian Murray on July 28th, 1983. We have a series of photographs that were taken before the Offices were built, on its commanding position on the hill,  that show what Pakenham was like in 1983. The group of photographs were labelled 'Photos of Pakenham outside our Office, before it was built'

This is looking east towards the Pakenham Consolidated School, (the white roofed building just left of centre) which was located between Main Street and McGregor Road and moved to Rundell way in 1997.

This is also looking east and adjoins the photo above.

Looking nearly south east, this photograph adjoins the one above. The house you can see on the left of the photograph (white house, silver roof) is on the corner of Rogers Street and McGregor and the McGregor Road Railway crossing.

Looking south - this photo adjoins the one above. 


Looking north towards St James' Anglican Church on the corner of Main Street and McGregor Road. 

Looking north again towards St Patrick's Catholic Church on the Highway.


Looking down the hill to Pakenham High School

Looking  north east to the Lily Pond

I believe the photograph above and the three below complete the view from the hill so they looking from east  (Cardinia Road) to south (HenryRoad) - or vice versa.
  



The Playdate

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The Playdate by Louise Millar     

From the cover:  Sound designer Callie Roberts is a single mother. And she's come to rely heavily on her best friend and neighbour, Suzy. Over the past few lonely years, Suzy has been good to Callie and her rather frail daughter, Rae, and she has welcomed them into her large, apparently happy family. But Callie knows Suzy's life is not quite as perfect as it seems. Its time she pulled away and she needs to get back to work. So why does she keep putting off telling Suzy? And who will care for Rae in the anonymous city street, the houses each hide a very different family, each with their own secrets. Callie's increased sense of alienation lets her to try and befriend a new resident, Debs. But she's odd and you certainly wouldn't trust her with your child, especially if you knew her past. 


This story, a kind of genre blend between chick lit and psychological suspense, dragged its feet initially but, unusually for me, I stuck with it.  Why I'm not sure, but at CD number 6 of 8, I became completely absorbed.  Clare Corbett does a brilliant narration, moving easily between different English accents, both male and female, and the American Suzy. There were a couple of twists in this book, one easier to spot than the other, and overall it was a good read though definitely would have benefitted with more diligent editing.  
We have this title in hardcover, large print, audio CD and e-book format.  To reserve a copy, just click on the title at the top of this post. 
Deb. 

After Glow

Reading Rewards - reviews -

After Glow by Jayne Ann Krentz writing as Jayne Castle 

From the cover:  Life is complicated for Lydia Smith.  She’s working at that tacky, third-rate museum trying to salvage her career in para-archaeology, and dating the most dangerous man in town.  Just when she thinks she might be getting things under control, she stumbles over a dead body and discovers that her lover has a secret past that could get him killed.  Just to top it off, there’s trouble brewing underground in the eerie, glowing green passageways of the Dead City.  Of course, all these problems pale in comparison to the most pressing issue: Lydia has been invited to the Restoration Ball and she hasn’t got a thing to wear!

I think this genre is called paranormal romance.  It’s my first-ever ‘dip a toe’ in this arena and surprise, surprise, I quite liked it, though I get the feeling it’s part of a series. Perhaps because Jayne Ann Krentz  has the business of writing down pat; or perhaps because it was very well narrated by Joyce Bean; or maybe it seemed very reminiscent of Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner in Romancing the Stone -  lots of action, quick humour and a love story to keep things simmering.  Whatever, I enjoyed it!  
Deb. 

Pygmalion - A Play by George Bernard Shaw

Reading Rewards - reviews -

Not many people in their teen years have heard of the play Pygmalion, I mean most of us don’t even read plays! I read this for a school assignment but for me it became so much more. As an avid fan of the movie My Fair Lady with Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison, I was extremely excited to hear that this play if what the movie was based off. Set in the early 1900s under Edwardian rule, this play is about a teacher of phonetics, the science of speech, and Eliza Doolittle a poor flower girl trying to get by on the little amount of money she makes. Higgins meets Eliza in not the best of situation with her convinced he's a cop and thinks she was ‘coming onto’ an older gentlemen. She is absolutely horrified to say the least, you can imagine the noises she makes with her horrid cockney accent when she’s in a rush! As the play progress’s Higgins decide’s to take Eliza on as a bet of a sort with a friend of his Colonel Pickering a fellow linguist (scientist of speech if you will) that he could transform Eliza and even pass her off as the queen of Sheba within 13 months. A the bet progresses and Eliza is taught how to speak and act like a proper elegant and well-dressed lady, more problems, feeling, and characters come to light. The real question in will Eliza ever be able to pull it off and what will happen to her now if she doesn’t?As a play it is very different from a book in how you read it and how to understand what exactly is happening so I’ll give you some tips. All stage directions will be in italics and [brackets], it gives actors directions for movement and expression. At the beginning of each act, think of them as chapters if you will, there will always be a very detailed setting so that you know exactly of your surroundings because that is how it was meant to be done on stage. When one character is speaking to the other it may come up with them speaking their name and then saying something aimed to them and them alone. One thing that i found to be a great help was of you completely had no clue what a word meant just have a dictionary on you lap or on a laptop. By the end of the book your vocabulary will clearly be the resplendently refined that you will be able to baffle all whom you meet just like Eliza does.If you happen to enjoy the move that was based of this play then I recommend you read this too as it opens your eyes so much to all of these other idea’s and things that were meant to happen and coincide with each other, I for one find it absolutely fascinating. I see now that I have rambled on quite a bit about this play probably because for me I’ve always wondered if more happened beyond the movie because as they say all of the best movies are based off books. As far as I know this doesn’t have any prizes behind it like many others of the time but it does have a string of performances and a movie featuring some of the most brilliant actors and singers alike starring in it.- L.E Simpkin (Work Experience Student)The movie based off the play.

Pygmalion - A Play

Reading Rewards - reviews -

Pygmalion - A Play by George Bernard Shaw


A review by L.E Simpkin (Casey-Cardinia Library Corporation Work Experience Student - Age 15.)

Not many people in their teen years have heard of the play Pygmalion.  I mean most of us don’t even read plays! I read this for a school assignment but for me it became so much more. As an avid fan of the movie My Fair Lady with Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison, I was extremely excited to hear that this play is what the movie was based on.

Set in the early 1900's under Edwardian rule, this play is about a teacher of phonetics, the science of speech, and Eliza Doolittle a poor flower girl trying to get by on the little amount of money she makes. Higgins meets Eliza in not the best of situations with her convinced he's a cop and thinks she was ‘coming onto’ an older gentlemen. She is absolutely horrified to say the least. You can imagine the noises she makes with her horrid cockney accent when she’s in a rush! As the play progresses Higgins decides to take Eliza on as a bet of a sort with a friend of his,  Colonel Pickering a fellow linguist (scientist of speech if you will) that he could transform Eliza and even pass her off as the queen of Sheba within 13 months. A the bet progresses and Eliza is taught how to speak and act like a proper elegant and well-dressed lady, more problems, feeling, and characters come to light. The real question is will Eliza ever be able to pull it off and what will happen to her now if she doesn’t?

As a play it is very different from a book in how you read it and how to understand what exactly is happening so I’ll give you some tips. All stage directions will be in italics and [brackets], it gives actors directions for movement and expression. At the beginning of each act, think of them as chapters if you will, there will always be a very detailed setting so that you know exactly of your surroundings because that is how it was meant to be done on stage. When one character is speaking to the other it may come up with them speaking their name and then saying something aimed to them and them alone. One thing that I found to be a great help was if you completely had no clue what a word meant just have a dictionary on your lap or on a laptop. By the end of the book your vocabulary will clearly be so resplendently refined that you will be able to baffle all whom you meet just like Eliza does.

If you happen to enjoy the movie that was based of this play then I recommend you read this too as it opens your eyes so much to all of these other ideas and things that were meant to happen and coincide with each other, I for one find it absolutely fascinating.

I see now that I have rambled on quite a bit about this play probably because for me I’ve always wondered if more happened beyond the movie because as they say all of the best movies are based on books.

As far as I know this doesn’t have any prizes behind it like many others of the time but it does have a string of performances and a movie featuring some of the most brilliant actors and singers alike starring in it.


Note:  We can add that My Fair Lady won many awards in 1965 - including Best Picture Oscar, Best Actor in a Leading Role Rex Harrison , Best Director George Cukor, Best Cinematography, Best Costume Design, and Best  Music. Here's a clip about the making of the movie from the play.

Your library has many formats of Pygmalion - click here to reserve one!

The Vanishings

Book Swamp -

The Vanishings
Author: Michael Panckridge
Type of story: Mystery

This story, is about a young girl named Fran. Her sister is lost and she seems to be in two different worlds. The Land of Shadows and the real world. She meets all sorts of different people, asking to help her find her sister Carly.
This story so thrilling to read, full of action and mystery!
How good was it? Fantastic

Naomi
Age: 11

Pygmalion

Quicksand -

Pygmalion - A Play by George Bernard Shaw

Not many people in their teen years have heard of the play Pygmalion.  I mean most of us don’t even read plays! I read this for a school assignment but for me it became so much more. As an avid fan of the movie My Fair Lady with Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison, I was extremely excited to hear that this play is what the movie was based off.
Set in the early 1900's under Edwardian rule, this play is about a teacher of phonetics, the science of speech, and Eliza Doolittle a poor flower girl trying to get by on the little amount of money she makes. Higgins meets Eliza in not the best of situations with her convinced he's a cop and thinks she was ‘coming onto’ an older gentlemen. She is absolutely horrified to say the least. You can imagine the noises she makes with her horrid cockney accent when she’s in a rush! As the play progresses Higgins decides to take Eliza on as a bet of a sort with a friend of his,  Colonel Pickering a fellow linguist (scientist of speech if you will) that he could transform Eliza and even pass her off as the queen of Sheba within 13 months. A the bet progresses and Eliza is taught how to speak and act like a proper elegant and well-dressed lady, more problems, feeling, and characters come to light. The real question is will Eliza ever be able to pull it off and what will happen to her now if she doesn’t?

As a play it is very different from a book in how you read it and how to understand what exactly is happening so I’ll give you some tips. All stage directions will be in italics and [brackets], it gives actors directions for movement and expression. At the beginning of each act, think of them as chapters if you will, there will always be a very detailed setting so that you know exactly of your surroundings because that is how it was meant to be done on stage. When one character is speaking to the other it may come up with them speaking their name and then saying something aimed to them and them alone. One thing that I found to be a great help was if you completely had no clue what a word meant just have a dictionary on your lap or on a laptop. By the end of the book your vocabulary will clearly be so resplendently refined that you will be able to baffle all whom you meet just like Eliza does.

If you happen to enjoy the movie that was based of this play then I recommend you read this too as it opens your eyes so much to all of these other ideas and things that were meant to happen and coincide with each other, I for one find it absolutely fascinating.
I see now that I have rambled on quite a bit about this play probably because for me I’ve always wondered if more happened beyond the movie because as they say all of the best movies are based off books.
As far as I know this doesn’t have any prizes behind it like many others of the time but it does have a string of performances and a movie featuring some of the most brilliant actors and singers alike starring in it.

L.E Simpkin (Work Experience Student)
Age 15

Note: I can add that My Fair Lady won many awards in 1965 - including Best Picture Oscar, Best Actor in a Leading Role Rex Harrison , Best Director George Cukor, Best Cinematography,  Best Costume Design, and Best  Music. Here's a clip about the making of the movie from the play. Cen




In the Shadow of Gallipoli

Reading Rewards - reviews -

In the Shadow of Gallipoli by Robert Bollard
Our vision of Gallipoli and the First World War is of a young nation proving themselves in defence of the Empire. We have been bought up to believe that our country was united by conflict and behind our soldiers all the way. The shadow of Gallipoli sets out to dispel some of this myth.

It is not about the war and the conflict in Europe but about the conflict in Australia which continued throughout the war years. Though at first there may have been a great deal of patriotic fervour, this waned steadily as the casualty lists came in from Gallipoli and continue to go down as a huge percentage of young men were slaughtered on the western front. The war years were punctuated by massive strikes in a number of key industries, the failure of two referendums to enforce conscription, the alienation and victimisation of Irish Australians, unionists, and anyone who disagreed with the government. 

This book will certainly give a new insight into the past but also shed light on the present; a very interesting read.
Fay



Garfield North School. No. 3849

Links to our Past - history -

Dr Ron Smith has written a history of Garfield North Primary School. The book is called The school on the small plateau: the history of Garfield North State School, No. 3849. The book was officially launched on July 13, 2014 by past student, Alan Forte, whom some of you may know as he operates a veterinary surgery in Pakenham. Alan did all his primary schooling at Garfield North. His father and uncle, Ian and Terence Forte also attended the school as did some of his relatives from the Towt family. Ron Smith taught at the school in 1970 until the end of 1972. Ron then moved on to another local school, Catani.

There was at school at Garfield, the Cannibal Creek State School which had opened in 1886. The School was located on the Princes Highway, west of North Garfield Road. In 1887 the School, the Railway Station and the town changed their name to Garfield. In 1899, the School building was re-located to Garfield Road at the top of the hill, half way between the Princes Highway and the Railway Station. In 1910, the Garfield School No. 2724 moved to a new building on its present site near the Railway Station. The old school building was removed in 1914 to North Garfield where it became State School No.3489.

Mrs Agnes Towt  was very active in getting a school at North Garfield. She was a trained teacher and a mother of three children. A petition to the Education Department from the locals in 1910 came to nothing (the petition had been presented to the local MLA in December 1910, and an Inspector was sent to make  a report in April 1911 and did not recommend a school) so in June 1912 Mrs Towt wrote to the Education Department and another Inspector made a report in June 1912 and this time recommended that a school be provided. In the mean time, Mrs Towt found a suitable site for the school and organised the purchase from a local land owner. The section of this land that the school was situated on, was described by the Public Works Department as a 'small plateau', hence the title of the book.  In October 1913, the Public Works Department recommended that the old Garfield school building  be removed to North Garfield, however  this did not happen until July 1914 and the school finally opened on July 20 1914 with Miss Daisy Body as the first teacher  and 15 children enrolled.

 Due to declining numbers the school closed down on March 6, 1973. In April 1978 it opened as a outdoor Education centre.  The book is well illustrated with many interesting stories and anecdotes; there is a full list of students and teachers. You can borrow  a copy of this book, click here for availability. If you wish to purchase you own copy, then it is available from the Post Office in Garfield.

Blueeyedboy

Reading Rewards - reviews -

Blueeyedboy by Joanne Harris 
A Bolinda download narrated by Colin Moody

From the cover:  Blueeyedboy is the new novel from Joanne Harris: a dark and intricately plotted tale of a poisonously dysfunctional family, a blind child prodigy, and a serial murderer who is not who he seems. Told through posts on a webjournal called badguysrock, this is a thriller that makes creative use of all the multiple personalities, disguise and mind games that are offered by playing out a life on the internet.

I really enjoyed Chocolat and was looking forward to Blueeyedboy as I love a good thriller. Unfortunately, this isn’t one.  It’s just a confusing ping pong match of blogposts and comments, one where you think you’ve got a handle on the character one moment, then blip, that disappears like a deleted email.  The book is riddled with dysfunctional characters, none more so than blueeyedboy’s mother with her china dog collection and a penchant for delivering beatings with electric cords, fists and feet. 

After finishing the book, I saw a review where Joanne Harris said that, as authors often say, the story just carried her along to its natural end, so she had to return to rewrite the second half to fit the conclusion.  That’s a pretty good summation because I still can’t make sense of it. 
Deb

Langwarrin Military Reserve

Casey-Cardinia 1914-1918: the Great War -

Before Federation each Colony was responsible for its own defence. The Victorian Volunteer Act 1854 allowed for the establishment of volunteer units. From 1860 many towns had their own Volunteer unit , including Dandenong which was the head quarters of the local volunteers.   From 1884, the Volunteer Forces were replaced by the Victorian Militia Force. The Militia forces were part-time like the Volunteers but they were paid.and they were obligated to attend a certain amount of training each year in the form of annual camps.

The Volunteers and the Militia  trained at various locations in Victoria, such as Werribee and Queenscliffe, but it became apparent that a permanent training ground needed to be established by the Victorian Government and,  in 1886, land at Langwarrin was set aside for this purpose. The land had gentle slopes, natural water supplies and  a variety of vegetation. The reserve eventually consisted of 549 acres or 222 hectares.


Encampment Langwarrin 1887State Library of Victoria Image H90.90/77
The first Langwarrin camp was held at Easter  in  1887.  The first buildings at the Reserve were stores for the Commissariat Corp; other buildings included caretakers quarters and  stables. Roads, Parade Grounds, and a  rifle range were other structures erected.  Numbers at some camps were large - in the 1890s some camps had over 3, 500 men, plus hundreds of horses. Langwarrin was used to train contingents of Victorians who went to the Boer war (1899-1902).



This is part of an article about the first camp held at LangwarrinAustralasian April 9 1887  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142178555
Originally, access to the Reserve was by trains which stopped at Frankston - after that troops, all supplies , horses etc had to be carted or travel down bush tracks to get to the Reserve.  An extension of the Frankston line was established and this reached the Reserve, with the station being called Langwarrin,  in October 1888.


Langwarrin Camp Ground 1897State Library of Victoria Image H4457
There was, for  a short time, a School on the Reserve. It was the Langwarrin Railway Station School. No. 3023. This had opened in 1890 in the Presbyterian Hall and then moved to  a purpose built school in 1895 on  the south-west corner of the Reserve, near the corner of McClelland Drive and Robinsons Road. This School burnt down, around 1905 and children then attended the Mornington Junction  School which was built on the corner of McClelland and Golf Links Road , near the railway line. In 1919, the name changed to Baxter and it moved to its present location on the six cross roads in 1954. To be more precise, some children attended the Mornington Junction School, other children did not go to school, as this article from the Mornington  Standard tells us. The parents said that they are more than three miles from the school and thus not required to send their children to school,  unless they take  a short-cut through the Military Reserve, which is a bit dangerous on the days when rifle practice is carried out!




Mornington Standard December 16, 1905http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65825568
The Reserve was handed over to the Commonwealth Government in March 1901 and various training camps were held  intermittently  and in declining frequency until World War One. The Reserve was not used to train men in World War One but it was used to house prisoners of war or internees i.e. German, Austrian and Turkish nationals that were in Australia after war was declared, and the crew of any German ships.  The Internment camp was first occupied at the end of 1914  Huts were built, a gaol was built for those that were deemed to need it. Most of these internees were removed to Liverpool in New South Wales in August 1915.


Victorian Infantrymen in camp at LangwarrinState Library of Victoria Image H4456

Langwarrin was then used to as a hospital for men infected with venereal diseases, as this was a problem amongst soldiers. At one stage, over 800 men were housed at the Langwarrin Reserve. The Hospital complex had an operating theatre, a dispensary, kitchen, engine house, dental surgery amongst other buildings.  The Langwarrin Camp was closed in February 1921. It was used occasionally for grazing, some training exercises during World War Two, the Frankston small bore rifle club had the lease of some of the land from 1960;  various sub-division proposals came and went and were never acted upon. In 1980 the Victorian Ministry for Conservation took over about 207 hectares of the land, in 1982 the remaining land was purchased and on December 11, 1985 the land became the Langwarrin Flora and Fauna Reserve.


Most of the information in this post comes from the book Australian Aldershot: Langwarrin Miltary Reserve Victoria 1886-1980 by Winty Calder (Jimaringle Publications, 1987)  The Library no longer has a lending copy of this book, we only have  a  reference copy in the Local History collection, which can be accessed by appointment

Hastings Western Port Historical Society has  copies for sale, if you wish to acquire your own copy of this interesting book.
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~dromana/hastings.htm

The Science Fiction Universe

Reading Rewards - reviews -

The Science Fiction Universe … and beyond – Syfy Channel Book of Sci-Fi –Text by Michael Mallory

From the cover:  The science fiction universe ... and beyond brings a breadth of knowledge, insight, and passion to a century of close encounters, black holes, time travel, distant planets, impossible quests, nuclear war, futuristic technology, inexplicable forces, spaceships, extraordinary monsters, and subterranean societies. Arranged chronologically, it follows the progression of sci-fi over the decades, dealing with a variety of classic films and television shows.
This book is a treat for those interested by this genre all the way from the classic old horror/SF authors like Edgar Allan Poe, H.G. Wells, and Jules Verne.  From the silent film monsters and early television superhero series to the continuing epics like Star Wars, Star Trek, Terminator, Avatar, Dr Who, Jurassic Park – too many to list!  It is divided into chapters covering different times and themes: ‘Early dreams and nightmares’; ‘Exploration of space’; ‘Space and relative time’; ‘Alternative times, alternative realities’; and so on.  You can dive into the various sections to follow your own particular favourites (Dr Who, Star Trek), or read it all to see how far we have travelled into the unknown future … or past.  Fascinating! Dot

Les Mis has arrived!

Reading Rewards - reviews -

This is just a little bit exciting ... 
In this series of photos the Chief Heritage Curator from Bibliotheque nationale de France is pictured in the State Library's Conservation lab with Conservator Ian Cox removing the original Victor Hugo Les Miserables manuscript from its protective case.  Check it out!! https://www.facebook.com/hashtag/vichugo
Deb.
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The Big Sister

Book Swamp -

 Billie B Brown - The Big Sister
Author: Sally Rippin

Billie expects her brother to be a sister, and she makes her little brother cry.  Then she feels bad about it. And then she plays with him behind the door.
How good was it? Fantastic
Type of story: Family

Maddison
Age: 8

The One and Only Ivan

Book Swamp -



The One and Only Ivan
Author: Katherine Applegate

This is another wonderful animal story based on real life events. Ivan is a gorilla who has spent nearly all of his 30 years life in captivity. His owner Mike, loves him but when Ivan becomes too big to handle in the family home, he puts him into an enclosure at the Exit 8 shopping mall that he owns and operates. At first, Ivan loves his life there and all the people who come to see him perform. He rarely thinks about the jungle life he was taken away from. However a new arrival at the mall, a baby elephant and a promise Ivan makes to his best friend changes all that and he sets about trying to gain a better life for both of them. It's a funny, heart warming and at times sad read, but one that will have you cheering for Ivan in the end. If you've read books by Michael Morpurgo you will love this book.

How good was it? Fantastic
Type of story: Animal
Jenny
Cranbourne Adventureres

Victor Hugo: Les Miserables

Reading Rewards - reviews -

The State Library of Victoria is about to launch a major international exhibition Victor Hugo: Les Miserables - From Page to Stage, coinciding with the 25th anniversary production in Melbourne of the Cameron Macintosh stage musical.  

The exhibition begins in 19th century Paris with the book itself – the Library has part of Hugo's original manuscript on loan from the Bibliothéque nationale de France.  The idea of a famous writer leaving their papers and manuscripts to a library was a new phenomenon in the 1880s.  When Victor Hugo, considered one of the greatest French writers of all time, decided to bequest his entire archive to the National Library of France in 1881, he began a hugely important trend that continues to this day.

The exhibition includes rare manuscripts, photographs and drawings by the writer himself, sculptures by Auguste Rodin, photographs by Charles Marville, prints by Charles Méryon as well as costumes, posters, photographs and texts covering over 150 years of theatrical, filmic and literary adaptations.  The exhibition includes loans from the Bibliothéque nationale de France, Maisons de Victor Hugo, Musée Rodin, Musée Canavalet and Cameron Macintosh.

When and where?
18 July - 9 November 2014
State Library of Victoria, 328 Swanston St, Melbourne
Exhibition Website: http://www.victorhugoexhibition.com.au
 
Be quick for this …

Victor Hugo: Les Misérables pop-up talk!

with Gérard Audinet, Director of the Maisons de Victor Hugo in Paris
 
1.00pm Friday 18 July 2014
3.00pm Saturday 19 July 2014

Bookings:
03 8664 7099
inquiries@slv.vic.gov.au

Deb.

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